Twenty Top Tips for Safe and Comfortable Travel by Bus

By Kathy Steinemann

Buses, while they take longer, may cost a fraction of the price for a comparable plane ticket. Modern buses might surprise you with their amenities. Follow these tips, and your next bus trip could be a pleasant experience that you decide to repeat.

Is travel by bus a viable alternative for a long-distance trip? Nowadays, they are not third-rate travel options. Buses often have free Wi-Fi, power outlets, and may even offer movies.

  • Before you buy your ticket, call the bus carrier or check online to see what amenities they offer.
  • Download movies, audio material, or eBooks to your smartphone or tablet before you leave. Remember that audio books require less battery power than movies or eBooks.
  • Pack nutritious snacks and bottled water for long trips, especially if you have special dietary requirements or allergies.
  • Carry clothing that you can put on or take off in layers. Air conditioning on the bus may not work properly.
  • An inflatable travel pillow and light blanket will help keep you comfortable on long-haul routes.
  • Beware of thieves in bus terminals. They may work in teams to divert your attention while they grab your luggage or pick your pockets.
  • With luggage stowed under the bus, LIFO is the rule (last in, first out).
  • When selecting a seat, ensure that it has electrical outlets if you need them, and confirm that the adjustable seat functions work correctly.
  • If you are sensitive to smells, avoid sitting near the washrooms or trash.
  • Do you have long legs? There is generally more leg room in the front-row seats or in the middle-row seat at the back of the bus. (The back seat is usually next to the lavatory, unfortunately.)
  • If you travel light with a small bag, you should be able to stow it under your seat. Secure the strap around your ankle so that nobody can steal your bag while you nap.
  • In some countries, seatbelts are required. If your bus has them, be sure that yours is secured whenever the bus is moving.
  • Be polite to others. Lower cellphone ringtone volumes and try to use text rather than voice to deal with business while you are on the bus.
  • If someone is working on a computer or wearing headphones, they probably do not want to engage in conversation.
  • Clean up any messes you make.
  • Keep purses, luggage, and legs out of the aisle.
  • Take your purse, tablet, laptop, or other valuables with you if you have to use the washroom.
  • Wiggle your toes, rotate/flex your ankles, and clench/relax your calf muscles periodically to avoid deep vein thrombosis.
  • Leave the bus whenever it stops for a break and walk around a bit. This will help you avoid soreness and stiff muscles at the end of the trip.
  • Use washrooms in bus stops whether you need to or not. They usually smell better and are cleaner than the bathrooms on the bus.

Follow these tips, and your next bus trip could be a pleasant experience that you decide to repeat.

(c) Copyright Kathy Steinemann: This article is free to publish only if this copyright notice, the byline, and the author’s note below (with active links) are included.

About the Author:

Kathy invites you to explore hundreds of travel tips in her recent eBooks, Top Tips for Travel by Air and Top Tips for Packing Your Suitcase. No eReader? No problem! Most eBook sites provide free reader apps for your PC, Mac, tablet, and smartphone. Article source: 111 Travel Directory: Triple1.com (triple one dot com)


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